Taping and Callous Care

 Andy's Manly Rip

Probably anyone who trains bar work has ripped, or will rip their callouses. Andy Taylor tells us his two methods for taping torn callouses so you can continue to train. Read more for in-depth instructions including a video.

First taping style: The point of taping is to apply pressure without restricting tendon movement. If you tape your tendons too tightly and you try to move, you can damage or bruise your tendons. Since we're taping the hand, make sure to fully open your hand. This means your hand is spread the entire time you’re taping. If you relax your hand you're likely to tape too tight. The first things that you’re going to need are athletic tape and scissors if you don’t know how to cut the tape otherwise. Leave the skin flap on. This serves as the best Band-Aid. Make sure there is no dirt in the rip, then pull the tape out in a strip and trace around the top curve of your hand with it. Wrap the tape around the back of your hand; as you come around to the front again, use your finger to make a hard turn between the middle of your middle and ring fingers. Start the tape back between the thumb and the back of your hand and use your finger to go in between the middle of your two fingers, then down on the back of your hand. (If this sounds confusing, watch the video for clarification.) Run the tape around the pinky side of your hand, then make another hard 90 degree angle in between your fingers on the inside of your hand again. Now that you’re to the middle of your two fingers, run the tape around the back of the hand to the thumb side, then around the front again to cover the front two 90 degree angles you just passed between your fingers. One more time around the back of the hand - this time as you come down go around the palm of your hand; bring the tape along the curve of the base of the hand at your wrist. Bring it back up along the back side of your hand to the thumb side and rip or cut the tape, making sure the finished end is resting on the back of your hand. On this last wrap, make sure that the top of the tape connects to the bottom of your previous wraps. End at the place you started, next to the thumb. If you are worried about the tape bunching up around the top of your hand because you want to play on the bars more: before you make this last wrap, bring the tape around the base of your thumb and around the wrist then back up to the pinky side of your previous tape wraps. Then go head and make the final wrap around the bottom pinky side.

Andy's finished tape, second techniqueSecond taping style:
The point of taping is to apply pressure without restricting tendon movement. If you tape your tendons too tightly and you try to move, you can damage or bruise your tendons. Since we're taping the hand, make sure to fully open your hand. This means your hand is spread the entire time you’re taping. If you relax your hand you're likely to tape too tight. Make a wrap and half around your wrist. Now pull a long strip of tape out. This should be long enough to go from between your fingers to the back of your hand. Take the tape and cut it in the center hot dog style on the sticky side so that the tape doesn’t stick together. Slip the finger that your rip is under through the hole, sticky side of the tape down. Connect the tape to the wrap that’s around your wrist. Pull another long strip of tape out and put it on your wrist to the left of the finger that you have the rip on and secure it to the tape on the back of your hand. Now do the same thing again but to the right of your finger.  Make sure these last two stretches of tape still reach down to the tape on your wrist. Now tape the original tape to your wrist with two wraps.





                   

 

 

 

 About the author: My name is Andy Taylor; I am 28 years old, born and raised in Melbourne, Florida.  I have been doing parkour and free running Andy Taylor doing his thingfor about 6 years. I have been running Zoic Nation for around 3. After growing up in such a small town, Orlando was filled with all these buildings and things I hadn’t really gotten to ever experience, my first inclination was too start finding ways to get on top of them and run around, and jump, from building to building. Then I was told I was doing something called parkour, upon looking up videos and scanning over various resources it just became what I wanted to do and be a part of all along. Parkour offers me constant progression, and it’s given me an outlet to be able to help everyone around me in my community and make them better, faster, and stronger. Something I always strive for personally. Not just for me but everyone around me, that’s why parkour is important to me and my daily routine, and why I would like it to be for a long time.

Zoic Nation is now rasing funds to build their own gym - check out their cool video about the project!

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Written by Ashley Wright   
Wednesday, 12 September 2012 17:39
Last Updated on Thursday, 13 September 2012 16:47